Interior Design Trends on the Decline in 2021

Modern Farmhouse 

Can you believe it?! The beloved 'Modern Farmhouse' look is finally on it's way out to the barn. Yes - it's hard to digest! Many people are sick of this aesthetic because it is particularly overdone in places like apartments, where modern farmhouse style might look exceptionally out-of-place. However, if you cannot resist the urge to incorporate this in your space - house, apartment, or the like - integrate rustic pieces that pair well with the rest of your decor.

White Kitchens 

Out with the plain and simple whites (and yes - that means brightly white kitchens) - and say hello to the exotic, rare stones and detailed patterns that have defined luxury style and stone. Some recommended options are breccias, richly veined marbles, and onyxes.

Open Floor Plans 

The COVID-19 pandemic really shaped the way we think of things - and how we view spaces. Many people recently learned (the hard way) that maybe your kitchen, home office, playroom, and living room shouldn't all share the same space. With that being said, we can expect to see the popularity of open floor plans begin to decline as we venture into the 2021 year.

Single Purpose Spaces and Furnishings 

The decline of single purpose spaces will be seen and the rise of intentional spaces taking over! It is important to keep things separate from each other while also being realistic. Creating spaces that have multi-functional purposes is going to be high for 2021.

Fast Furniture 

Inexpensive furniture and accessories that aren't made to last are drastically declining. If you see the post before this one (click HERE to read it) about how homeowners are starting to invest in custom-made furniture that is well built and not necessarily inexpensive is on the rise. People want quality, and we can expect the simple and quick furniture styles to fall exponentially out of favor and for the unique and quality pieces to take their place.

Minimalism 

This is no secret - minimalism went out the door when the pandemic struck. It isn't a sustainable way of life when there is shut downs and restricted hours of stores and more. The amount of time and resources that were spent and used inside of one's home throughout the 2020 year is proof enough that as we dive deeper into 2021, we'll see more eclectic styles and less of minimalism amongst homeowners.

Neutrals

With more time being spent at home, it is clear to see that neutral colors will be on the decline. Expressing your design interests is all about exploration, experimentation, and reflecting our personalities. We will see a rise in bolder accent color, items that are visually interesting, and playful design.

Faux Anything

Plastic and man-made materials will be on the decline throughout 2021. Natural and organic materials are in as people strive to focus on sustainability. Stone, wood, natural fabrics, and natural coloring methods will be on the rise! If your thumb is anything BUT green, preserved flowers are the solution to your brown thumb and can enable you to adapt sustainability.

Slipcovers for Sofas and Chairs

With the increasing popularity of high-tech and stain-resistant fabrics, homeowners are now seeing slipcovers to protect their furniture as obsolete. These fabrics are so durable and can resistant even the toughest of stains.

Terrazo

This patterned-tile look in bathrooms and kitchens have seen better days. This look is started to become dated and can make a great space look congested and crowded.

Mid-Century Modern 

Overplayed and overdone - it's time to lay mid-century modern to rest. We'll start to see warmer, more interesting pieces on the rise. Vertical lines, sleek furniture, geometric shapes on furniture and walls, and rich finishes are a few things that are going to take over throughout 2021.

Dark Colors

While dramatic, they can truly close off a space. While people continue to work remotely in 2021 and multi-purpose rooms become necessary, we'll see less of dark colors and more of neutral and bright wall colors.

 

For more info and to read the original article, click HERE